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Three Sisters Stew

Did you know that in many cultures, squash, beans, and corn are grown together, eaten

together, and celebrated together, as they are staples for a well-balanced, nutritious diet?

Often referred to as the Three Sisters, when growing, the corn provides a trellis for the beans,

beans add nitrogen to the soil, and the squash shades out the weeds. The ideal way these

plants work together in the garden is a beautiful representation of how they work together in

our bodies to provide well-balanced nutrition. Corn provides gut-healthy fiber plus tons of

vitamins and phytochemicals that help combat inflammation in the body. Meanwhile, beans are

rich in protein and fiber, and squash yields antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, including

vitamin A, calcium, magnesium, and a host of carotenoids. Plus, when consumed together,

these plant-based foods form what's known as a complete protein, meaning they provide your

body with all nine essential amino acids. Not only are these some of the most balanced,

nutrient-dense ingredients on the planet, but they are also extremely versatile and work with a

wide range of flavor profiles! Check out this amazing stew recipe below for a nutritious meal to

warm you up as winter weather settles in!


Three Sisters Stew

Ingredients

 1 large butternut squash or sugar pumpkin, about 2 pounds; or use pre-cut squash

 2 tablespoons olive oil

 1 onion medium, chopped

 3 cloves garlic minced

 1 bell pepper medium, green or red, cut into short narrow strips

 14 ounces fire-roasted diced tomatoes canned, with liquid

 2 ½ cups canned pinto beans drained and rinsed

 2 cups corn kernels fresh or frozen

 1 cup vegetable stock or water

 1 hot chili pepper fresh, seeded and minced; or substitute one 4-ounce can chopped

mild green chilies

 2 teaspoons ground cumin

 2 teaspoons chili powder or mesquite seasoning, add more to taste

 1 teaspoon dried oregano

 salt to taste

 black pepper to taste

 ¼ cup fresh cilantro or parsley, fresh, chopped

Instructions


1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

2. Remove stem from the pumpkin or squash and cut in half lengthwise. Cover with

aluminum foil and place the halves, cut side up, in a foil-lined shallow baking pan. If your

knives aren't sharp enough, just wrap the pumpkin or squash in foil and bake it whole.

Bake for 40 to 50 minutes, or until you can pierce through with a knife, with a little

resistance.

3. When cool enough to handle, scrape out the seeds and fibers (clean the seeds for

roasting, if you'd like). Slice and peel, then cut into large dice.

4. Heat the oil in a soup pot. Add the onion and sauté over medium-low heat until

translucent. Add the garlic and continue to sauté until the onion is golden.

5. Add the pumpkin or squash and all the remaining ingredients except the last 2 and bring

to a simmer. Simmer gently, covered, until all the vegetables are tender, about 20 to 25

minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

6. If time allows, let the stew stand for 1 to 2 hours before serving, then heat through as

needed. Just before serving, stir in the cilantro. The stew should be thick and very moist

but not soupy; add additional stock or water if needed. Adjust seasonings to your liking.

Scoop into bowls to serve.

7. Enjoy!

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